CTE identified in brain donations from young amateur athletes

Aug. 29, 2023
Study examined athletes who played contact sports, showed CTE symptoms, and died before age 30.

In a study of 152 deceased athletes less than 30 years old who were exposed to repeated head injury through contact sports, brain examination demonstrated that 63 (41%) had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disorder associated with exposure to head trauma. Neuropsychological symptoms were severe in both those with and without evidence of CTE. Suicide was the most common cause of death in both groups, followed by unintentional overdose.

Among the brain donors found to have CTE, 71% had played contact sports at a non-professional level (youth, high school, or college competition). Common sports included American football, ice hockey, soccer, rugby, and wrestling. The study, published in JAMA Neurology, confirms that CTE can occur even in young athletes exposed to repetitive head impacts. The research was supported in part by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.  

NIH release

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