Government policies to support people with dementia needed

Sept. 3, 2021

Only a quarter of countries worldwide have a national policy, strategy, or plan for supporting people with dementia and their families, according to a report from the World Health Organization (WHO).

Half of these countries are in WHO’s European Region, with the remainder split between the other regions. Yet even in Europe, many plans are expiring or have already expired, indicating a need for renewed commitment from governments.

At the same time, the number of people living with dementia is growing, according to the report. The WHO estimates that more than 55 million people (8.1 % of women and 5.4% of men over 65 years of age) are living with dementia. This number is estimated to rise to 78 million by 2030 and to 139 million by 2050.

Dementia is caused by a variety of diseases and injuries that affect the brain, such as Alzheimer’s disease or stroke. It affects memory and other cognitive functions, as well as the ability to perform everyday tasks. The disability associated with dementia is a key driver of costs related to the condition. In 2019, the global cost of dementia was estimated to be $ 1.3 trillion. The cost is projected to increase to $ 1.7 trillion by 2030, or $ 2.8 trillion if corrected for increases in care costs.

The report highlights the urgent need to strengthen support at national level, both in terms of care for people with dementia, and in support for the people who provide that care, in both formal and informal settings.

Care required for people with dementia includes primary health care, specialist care, community-based services, rehabilitation, long-term care, and palliative care. While most countries (89%) reporting to WHO’s Global Dementia Observatory say they provide some community-based services for dementia, provision is higher in high-income countries than in low- and middle-income countries. Medication for dementia, hygiene products, assistive technologies and household adjustments are also more accessible in high-income countries, with a greater level of reimbursement, than in lower-income countries.

The type and level of services provided by the health and social care sectors also determines the level of informal care, which is primarily provided by family members. Informal care accounts for about half the global cost of dementia, while social care costs make up over a third. In low- and middle-income countries, most dementia care costs are attributable to informal care (65%). In richer countries informal and social care costs each amount to approximately 40%.

In 2019, caregivers spent on average five hours a day providing support for daily living to the person they were caring for with dementia; 70% of that care was provided by women. Given the financial, social and psychological stress faced by caregivers, access to information, training and services, as well as social and financial support, is particularly important. Currently, 75% of countries report that they offer some level of support for caregivers, although again, these are primarily high-income countries.

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